Faculty Advisor(s)

Elaine Halesey

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Abstract

This research offers a comparison of two types of computed tomography (CT) configurations by exploring each scanner type and the accompanying image specifications, protocols, radiation doses, geometric aspects, and photographic aspects of the resulting images. The comparison aimed to determine if single-energy CT (SECT) or dual-energy CT (DECT) had any clear advantages over the other scanner type. Several studies in the research resulted in DECT displaying a decrease in dose without compromising contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). The studies in this research also showed DECT had a superior ability of decreasing iodine by 70% concentration dose while obtaining the same image quality as SECT at normal iodine dose. This research provides the reasoning that DECT is highly sought after for its abilities of dose reduction, metal reduction, improved iodine quantification, spectral separation, and temporal resolution. While DECT is far more expensive in a department than SECT, the research implicates it is more desirable for patients with prostheses, poor renal function, pediatrics, low dose lung studies, and any patient in need of a cardiac study. Further research should be performed on DECT due to its newness in the field of CT and more advancements that could additionally benefit patients and the technologists who utilize it.

Keywords: Computed tomography, comparative study, iodine, diagnostic imaging, single-energy computed tomography, dual-energy computed tomography

Publication Date

2020

Document Type

Poster

Department

Medical Imaging

Keywords

Computed tomography, comparative study, iodine, diagnostic imaging, single-energy computed tomography, dual-energy computed tomography

Disciplines

Medicine and Health Sciences

Single- and Dual-Energy CT: A Comparison

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